Fantasy & Beyond

A Book Forum for Speculative Fiction

Discuss and recommend non-fiction books & other media here.
#1172
I think we need a place like this, where we talk about random non-fiction items but that we're not necessarily reading now.

This to say that I won a HarperCollins ARC in a newsletter competition I entered.
It's called The Maps we carry by Rose Cartwright and this is the description:

What if treating misery as a medical problem is making us miserable?
In this revolutionary book, Rose Cartwright reveals how the failure of the mental health system to cure her OCD led her to radical action. While she explored her trauma through a series of mind-bending psychedelic trips, Rose started to interrogate our dominant medical paradigm.
What if people’s intense distress is not a symptom of illness, but a desperate expression of our need for love and connection? Rose set out on a quest to draw a new map of mental health, interviewing experts in psychiatry and neuroscience along the way: what she discovered will have implications for generations to come.
I'm a bit wary of some of those things, especially as I think that there are as many types of depression as there are people (even the same person doesn't suffer the same way twice...) but I'm looking forward to reading it.
DragonFlame, Peat liked this
#1192
ScarletBea wrote: April 11th, 2024, 10:42 I think we need a place like this, where we talk about random non-fiction items but that we're not necessarily reading now.

This to say that I won a HarperCollins ARC in a newsletter competition I entered.
It's called The Maps we carry by Rose Cartwright and this is the description:

What if treating misery as a medical problem is making us miserable?
In this revolutionary book, Rose Cartwright reveals how the failure of the mental health system to cure her OCD led her to radical action. While she explored her trauma through a series of mind-bending psychedelic trips, Rose started to interrogate our dominant medical paradigm.
What if people’s intense distress is not a symptom of illness, but a desperate expression of our need for love and connection? Rose set out on a quest to draw a new map of mental health, interviewing experts in psychiatry and neuroscience along the way: what she discovered will have implications for generations to come.
I'm a bit wary of some of those things, especially as I think that there are as many types of depression as there are people (even the same person doesn't suffer the same way twice...) but I'm looking forward to reading it.
Ooh I'm interested to see what you make of it.

I have to say while I'm a little skeptical of this as a one size fits all philosophy, it does make sense to me as a system for treating the disease and not the symptom in a lot of cases.